Two successful conferences, the Annual CRS (Birmingham) and the 51st DGPs (Frankfurt am Main)

September was a busy month, with two presentations in two countries less than 30 hours apart. Both were successful in terms of networking and reception.

For the first time ever, I presented at a meeting of political researchers. The Annual Conference of the Conflict Research Society (CRS) in Birmingham, UK, was small, vivid nevertheless. My contribution was to the social psychology panel organized by H.Blumberg. I was the representative of our research team (Oscar Smallenbroek, Regina Arant, and Klaus Boehnke) and gave a report of our work on how value development trajectories into adulthood can have an impact on political engagement in mid-adulthood (more on the project here).

CRS_screen shot slide

One of the findings can be seen in the image above. In our longitudinal data, we find that value preferences change from 1999 to 2017 in a sample of German adolescents and teenagers. In a subsequent model we show that this value trajectory chance can predict political behavior, however, the evidence is inconclusive. We are optimistic that this work will soon be submitted for publication.

Also for the first time ever, I attended the congress of the German association for psychology (DGPs). The meeting in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, was massive, accommodating approximately 2,800 colleagues. My contribution was to the paper session “D27 Interkulturelle und lebenslange Gruppenprozesse [intercultural and life long group processes].” I represented the work group that includes Erich H. Witte and Klaus Boehnke and gave a report on our attempt to provide an alternative methodology to arrive at values at the culture level.

DGPs_screen shot slide

Our main argument is that in the literature there has been a need for an alternative methodology. Yet, the status quo of interpreting the average scores over individuals in a country as culture level indicators of values has remained without a ‘competitor.’ We suggest an approach that uses frequencies of all ten individual level value types as a more adequate description of values at the culture level from a theory of measurement point of view. Above, the image illustrates these frequencies and their rank order in Germany in 2012, based on the 6th round of ESS data. Clearly, a high proportion of Germans (33.7%) could not be classified according to the theory of value preferences at the individual level. We are hopeful that this method will soon be published.